Download Normal Height And Weight Chart For Baby Boy for Free

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Archives
of
Disease
in
Childhood,
1973,
48,
786.
Height
and
weight
charts
from
birth
to
5
years
allowing
for
length
of
gestation
For
use
in
infant
welfare
clinics
J.
M.
TANNER
and
R.
H.
WHITEHOUSE
From
the
Department
of
Growth
and
Development,
Institute
of
Child
Health,
University
of
London
Tanner,
J.
M.,
and
Whitehouse,
R.
H.
(1973).
Archives
of
Disease
in
Childhood,
48,
786.
Height
and
weight
charts
from
birth
to
5
years
allowing
for
length
of
gestation:
for
use
in
infant
welfare
clinics.
Charts
enlarging
the
birth
to
5-year
section
of
the
standard
British
height
and
weight
charts
and
allowing
for
plotting
at
the
correct
length
of
gestation
are
described
and
illustrated.
The
standard
growth
charts
for
height
and
weight
(Tanner,
Whitehouse,
and
Takaishi,
1966)
which
cover
the
whole
age
range
from
birth
to
19
years
do
not
give
enough
space
for
accurate
and
repeated
plotting
in
the
first
2
years
after
birth,
a
facility
especially
required
in
infant
welfare
clinics.
We
have
therefore
redrawn
the
portion
of
the
charts
from
birth
to
2
years
as
shown
in
Fig.
1
and
2,
and
added,
on
a
less
extended
scale,
the
centiles
from
2
to
5
years.
Gairdner
and
Pearson
(1971)
have
already
published
a
chart
for
length,
weight,
and
head
circumference
up
to
2
years
which
achieves
the
same
objective
by
using
a
logarithmic
scale
for
age.
It
may
be
useful,
however,
to
offer
an
alternative
to
those
clinicians
who
prefer
an
arithmetic
age
scale,
with
more
vertical
space
for
plotting,
and
with
the
full
set
of
centiles
rather
than
only
the
10th,
50th,
and
90th
as
given
in
the
Gairdner
and
Pearson
charts.
Both
charts
are
based
on
the
same
weight
data
from
32
weeks
to
2
years
and
the
same
length
data
from
40
weeks
to
2
years.
The
Gairdner
and
Pearson
chart
starts
at
28
weeks,
but
is
based
on
scanty
data
from
28
to
32
weeks.
Like
Gairdner
and
Pearson,
we
have
provided
a
way
of
plotting
the
weights
and
lengths
of
preterm
babies.
A
baby
born
at
32
weeks'
gestation
should
not
be
plotted
12
weeks
after
birth
at
the
point
which
is
12
weeks
on
a
scale
starting
at
40-week
birth.
Using
the
notion
of
conceptional
age,
he
should
be
plotted
at
12
less
the
8
weeks
(40-32),
by
which
he
was
early
born.
A
baby
born
at
32
weeks,
who
12
Received
26
February
1973.
weeks
later
is
exactly
average
in
weight
for
conceptional
age,
appears
erroneously
to
be
well
below
the
3rd
centile
if
plotted
at
12
weeks
after
a
40-week
birth.
The
measurement
of
supine
length
at
birth
and
in
infancy
is
not
yet
routine
in
the
U.K.
chiefly
because
unreliability
of
technique
has
rendered
the
values
suspect.
The
recent
introduction
of
the
Holtain
neonatometer
(Davies
and
Holding,
1972)
has
removed
this
difficulty
and
makes
the
absolute
(though,
of
course,
not
the
relative)
error
in
measuring
preterm
and
term
babies
about
equal
to
that in
measuring
children's
lengths.
Measure-
ments
of
length
are
of
importance
in
the
early
diagnosis
of
growth
hormone
deficiency
(though
weight
is
not,
as
these
children
have
excessive
fat).
They
might
also
be
an
aid
in
detecting
early
hypothyroidism
(von
Harnack
et
al.,
1972).
The
preterm
lengths
given
in
Fig.
1
have
been
derived
from
Swedish
sources
(see
Tanner
and
Thomson,
1970),
but
will
be
replaced
by
U.K.
data
when
studies
with
the
neonatometer
are
completed.
There
are
separate
charts
for
boys
and
girls
(only
boys
given
in
Fig.
1
and
2).
On
the
front
of
the
chart
notes
on
the
use
of
the
charts
are
given,
and
on
the
back
are
illustrations
and
instructions
on
the
technique
of
measuring
supine
length
and
standing
height,
with
a
table
of
decimal
age.
For
plotting
height
and
weight
at
a
given
age
either
decimal
age
or
the
less
accurate
years
and
months
may
be
used,
but
in
plotting
velocity
and
rate
of
growth
(using
the
1966
velocity
charts
at
present)
the
use
of
decimals
makes
the
calculations
much
easier.
786
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Normal Height And Weight Chart For Baby Boy
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